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Poster: lobster12 Date: May 4, 2007 4:22pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: greek theatre

Never got to see the dead perform there. Someone posted the history of the "greek theatre" last week and I wanted to know from folks what the one in Berkeley is like. In a nut shell give me the specifics on seating, ect. The one is LA is beautiful, but does not reflect a true "greek theatre" representation.

THX

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Poster: deadmax Date: May 4, 2007 7:13pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

I saw lots of shows there. Well, several. You can see from the picture what the seating is like. But if you're down in the bowl all you see is the stage. When you get to the grass above the seats you see San Francisco across the bay and the sun sets behind it - Beautiful. But one of the most amazing things to me is the eucalyptus trees! You smell eucalyptus the whole time you're there, not like cough drops, more like a light incense wafting through the air. Also, very intimate without being really, really small. The stage is not real big so the band was RIGHT THERE.

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Poster: AshesRising Date: May 4, 2007 7:25pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

lobster12:
I posted that link to the original "Greek Theatres" from a couple of thousand years ago. I have no idea how to describe the one in Berkeley so maybe just one set from a show there can provide some insight:

(1984-07-13 - Friday - 2nd set) The unique "Scarlet>Touch>Fire" to open the set and my favorite post-'1974 "Dark Star" as an encore.
http://www.archive.org/details/gd84-07-13.sbd.ferguson.353.sbeok.shnf

(Unfortunately on other years the stage/shrine was defiled by motorcycles hooked-up to mics during "drums/space," Bobby and his gazoo/whistle thing, etc.)

--- AshesRising

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Poster: lobster12 Date: May 4, 2007 8:38pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

many thanks. the night of the lunar eclipse, correct?

What a venue.

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Poster: AshesRising Date: May 5, 2007 12:15am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

lobster12:
...I wasn't at the show and I haven't been able to confirm the lunar eclipse spectacle from on-line sources

Legend has it from multiple credible sources in attendance that a shooting star streaked across the heavens just prior to "Dark Star."

--I'm off to get lost in some late '60's/early '70's shows that William Tell sent to me with his stretched bow. (Thanks for the backstory on the name) --- AshesRising

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Poster: lobster12 Date: May 5, 2007 8:33am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

I thought it was something to that effect

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Poster: rastamon Date: May 5, 2007 9:57am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

7/13/84-
It was friday the 13th and an almost full moon

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Poster: BryanE Date: May 4, 2007 6:52pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

Maybe this will help give you an idea.

http://www.berkeley.edu/news/media/releases/2003/09/11_greek.shtml

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Poster: Purple Gel Date: May 4, 2007 11:05pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

A couple of other unique and wonderful things about the Greek:

The first 2 or 3 years, Graham had speakers set up in an adjacent field so that those who were unable to get in would be able to congregate, dance and feel like part of the show. In '81 my friendwere late with my ticket to the first show, so i spent half the 1st set there and it was great, the crowd was cheering and dancing and it was almost like being in the show itself.

Also, the Greek was wired for sound, even in the bathrooms, so you could wander around, even in the stairways on the side, and never miss the clarity of sound you got at your seat. The only other place I saw the Dead where there were speakers in the john, and in the bars upstairs, was the old Oakland Aud (later called henry Kaiser). Uncle Bobo knew how to throw a great concert.

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Poster: cush11 Date: May 5, 2007 9:54pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

Like they all said...

:)

Attachment: cush212-greek_fromsouthcorner.jpg
Attachment: cush212-greek_fromtopoflawn_2.jpg
Attachment: cush212-_dsc0621.jpg

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Poster: lobster12 Date: May 6, 2007 11:17am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

Thnaks for the pics. do you know what type of acts play the greek and frost these days? just curious

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Poster: bluedevil Date: May 6, 2007 11:24am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

I can't answer for the Frost, because haven't seen a show there in over a decade (saw the boys there several times as well as Miles (RIP) and Metheney). The Greek hosts everyone you would expect to see at any larger venue. Recent shows I've seen there were Massive Attack and Radiohead, while the Arcade Fire is upcoming. I've seen Van the Man, King Crimson, Zappa and others there (obviously that was in the past). Oh, the White Stipes were there last big tour around. So, that gives you an idea. I consider it the outdoor venue in California. Others may disagree...

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Poster: lobster12 Date: May 6, 2007 12:09pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

what a venue. LA has the greek and the hollywood bowl but vastly different. Thanks for all the info gents!

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Poster: cush11 Date: May 6, 2007 11:29am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

http://www.tickco.com/venue_schedules/greek_theatre_Berkley.htm

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: May 5, 2007 9:39am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

I never saw the Dead there, they got banned two months before I saw my first show : (

The closest I came was that Comes A Time show a couple of years ago and that was a special day, killer weather too. I've seen Van Morrison and Rickie Lee Jones there as well as the AIRPLANE reunion in 89.

I LOVE the Greek, it's my favorite venue. I like it more than Red Rocks. Red Rocks goes up and up and up and you get farther away whereas the Greek is a horse shoe and you get a more intimate feel because of it. Also as someone stated if you're up high you can see S.F. and the Bay Bridge not to mention the Berkely clock tower. Beautiful view.

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Poster: elkdog Date: May 5, 2007 10:25am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

I live about three blocks away from the Berkeley Greek right now. As others have said, the horseshoe shape of it makes it feel really intimate. The seating bowl is pretty steep, too, so you get great sightlines. The sound is good, the venue is laid back, and as has been mentioned, lawn seats come with a hell of a view. It's my favorite venue, too.

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: May 5, 2007 11:57am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

Elkdog, do you go to U.C. Berkeley? I love that area. I used to work at the Tower that's no longer there on Durant. I have so many great memories. I'd love to move back if I could afford it.

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Poster: elkdog Date: May 5, 2007 12:30pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

I'm a Masters student at the Graduate Theological Union- right near the North Gate of UC. I'm finishing up, though, and am headed to New Jersey this summer to start a Ph.D. I love it here, and am going to miss it a lot. It's been great to have an excuse to live in the Bay Area for a couple of years. If I didn't get subsidized housing through school, I don't think I could afford to live out here.

This post was modified by elkdog on 2007-05-05 19:30:12

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: May 5, 2007 12:35pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

WOW! Very impressive. Good for you. Are you from the East Coast? I'll save my comments about back there just in case : )

What exactly entails your study of Theology? I mean is it across the board or soley Christian? Can you answer me questions I always have? Like what's the difference between what people think the Bible says and what was actually written? And of course lots of other Historical based questions that " believers" as opposed to scholars can NEVER answer.

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Poster: elkdog Date: May 5, 2007 12:40pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

Hey, Thanks. I'm from North Carolina orginally, so I'll be a lot closer to home in NJ. I'll have easy access to NYC from where I'll be, so I think it'll be ok, if not as scenic or laid back. I'll be busy wherever I go.

My work is primarily on issues of social justice, and how theology can help Christians really sincerely engage those issues. I have done a decent amount of work with Jewish thought, and on the relationship between Christianity and Judaism, but other than that it's been all Christianity (though respect for and mutual learning from other religions is a core value for me and most of my colleagues).

The question of what is "really written" in the Bible is difficult, because the Bible was assembled from a multitude of sources which were almost all written in Hebrew and Greek. The layers of translation between those sources and anything you or I might have on our shelf makes the original content nigh unto impossible to discern. I don't think any translator can be totally objective, so various translations have the fingerprints of the scribe's beliefs upon them. I do think, though, that the Bible, or any sacred text, is not a static revelation; the text can and should speak in a unique way to our context. The trick is to figure out what it is saying to us, and to do that honestly and bravely.

So, I'm rambling. I'd love to hear your questions and your thoughts/beliefs. I can only tell you what I think, but occasionally there is a pretty solid answer available, especially when you're talking about history. If I can't be of help on historical questions, I may be able to point you toward the right resources, etc.

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Poster: johnnyonthespot Date: May 5, 2007 1:02pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

Thank you so much for the feedback. I'd love to talk to you about this stuff. I dig talking about philosophical, metaphysical, spiritual things. What I don't like is the way the average person of " faith" doesn't seem to do anything other than accept what they're told. It turns topics I find ranging from intersting at the least to very important in how much influence they have on humans ( directly or indirectly ) into this nasty breeding ground of division,hate, and intolerance. I don't know if that makes sense. I tend to write run on sentences.

Here's one question - why must the entire Christian belief system hinder on one absolutely HAVING to belief Christ rose from the Dead? Why can't acceptance of his teachings etc. be good enough? The Gospels themselves don't agree on all who were even there to witness. Personally I beleive either a) he didn't die or more likely b) the story was created out of desperation to keep the Christian movement alive. To even suggest this to a Christian automatically makes me on a one way trip to hell. I mean come on! Why would a supreme being knock you down for using the logic and critical thought you were given? Faith can be a dangerous thing imo.

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Poster: elkdog Date: May 5, 2007 1:42pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

I completely agree with you on the need to examine and discuss religious beliefs. It's frightening at times, but it's something I feel compelled to do. I'm glad people like you will keep asking those questions; reason is indeed a gift, and we ought to employ it in our religion. Don't stop.

The Resurrection is a real snag in Christianity for a lot of people, not just for you. I think there are even more people who don't admit that they are not at all sure about it. Here's one way that I like to look at it.
Jesus of Nazareth was crucified. Historical records exist to prove that much, and it's frankly not an incredible supposition. The resurrection, though, is neither proven nor disproven, so it becomes a matter of faith. I think it's important to acknowledge that. If it happened, then it's an amazing event that codifies our salvation. Jesus' resurrection, as described in the Bible, would be a promise of triumph over death for those who live into the covenant he brought forth, and that sounds great to me. "There is neither Jew nor Greek, there is neither slave nor free man, there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus." -Gal.3:28. That's not an exclusive offer to a few people, but a wide open extension of God's love to each person.
If it didn't happen, then I think Jesus is still worth following. The love and acceptance that are taught in the Gospels, as well as the refusal to simply tolerate oppression, are things that I very much believe in. I go back and forth on the resurrection; I'd like for it to be true, but I can't know for sure. I do, though, have faith that following the example of Christ is a way to make this world better, and to draw closer to the divine, whom I call God.

What do you think about Cornell '77? Is it real? There's some fine music there either way.

This post was modified by elkdog on 2007-05-05 20:40:09

This post was modified by elkdog on 2007-05-05 20:42:00

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Poster: bluedevil Date: May 5, 2007 1:58pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

I have great faith in the god in which I don't believe.
Why?
Friday, July 13, 1984 was my first show of any band at the Greek. not a bad start....

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Poster: elkdog Date: May 5, 2007 2:02pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: greek theatre

Not bad at all!